The Unexpected Lesson of Mark Foley

The Republicans got another–and unneeded–setback in their quest to retain control of the House of Representatives with the resignation of Representative Mark Foley over his sexually charged emails to some of his pages.

The fact that these are disgusting and that he needs to go is not in question, at least not for us. The whole Foley fiasco, however, illustrates the central problem of the current status of sexual activity under law in most Western countries.

At the start for predominantly Christian cultures, sexual activity was restricted to conjugal relations between a man and wife. This automatically excluded homosexuality (since marriage was and generally is between a man and a woman) and sex with and amongst minors (since marriage was restricted to adults.)

Unfortunately a central tenet of all kinds of left-wing movements is that sexual activity is a necessary centrepiece of a fulfilled, actualised life. So they started by allowing straight up, heterosexual fornication. To facilitate this, they forced the legalisation of birth control and abortion, which is the real meaning of Griswold vs. Conneticut and Roe vs. Wade.

The problem of that is simple: where do you stop? Once this move is made, the goalposts of legal sexual activity acquire wheels, moved around by whoever has the most push. The most obvious result of this was the SCOTUS’ nullification of anti-sodomy laws in Lawrence vs. Texas.

But why here? Most Americans find the whole idea of sexual exploitation of children revolting, but then again they didn’t like the idea of abortion on demand either. And there are forces that would like to change that, too, ones which are well entrenched in our elites. This explains the diffident attitude of many on a lot of the anti-sexual predator laws which come before our state legislatures.

While we’re on the subject, we should not forget that, in the past, a few cultures–and one in particular–used the kinds of sexual contact between Rep. Foley and their young charges as a way for the latter to move up in the world. We explored this issue last year and it bears repeating again.

The central problem with our current situation is that it sends seriously mixed signals to everyone, especially the young. We cannot on the one hand allow (and in our culture encourage) people to have unrestricted sexual activity in some areas outside of marriage and, once these people are aroused, put draconian restrictions on others and result in anything but confusion. And that’s where we are today. If we allow this situation to continue, in a generation the behaviour that cost Rep. Foley his seat in the House will become the real reason that young people go to Washington to be pages: to move up…

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