Underestimating the Clintons is a Dangerous Game

Johnathan Chait’s piece in the New Republic is correct in showing how Hillary Clinton could win the Democrat nomination:

Clinton’s path to the nomination, then, involves the following steps: kneecap an eloquent, inspiring, reform-minded young leader who happens to be the first serious African American presidential candidate (meanwhile cementing her own reputation for Nixonian ruthlessness) and then win a contested convention by persuading party elites to override the results at the polls. The plan may also involve trying to seat the Michigan and Florida delegations, after having explicitly agreed that the results would not count toward delegate totals. Oh, and her campaign has periodically hinted that some of Obama’s elected delegates might break off and support her.

But his conclusion is a little too confident:

I don’t think she’d be in a position to defeat Hitler’s dog in November, let alone a popular war hero.

Underestimating these people has cost too many people–Republican and Democrat alike–too much, and if John McCain and the Republicans face her and repeat this mistake, they will end up the losers.

The Republicans’ basic problem is that the country has changed, as I mentioned earlier.  McCain’s victory is, in a backhanded way, a tip of the hat to this.  But the Republicans need to do more than to tip their hat.  We need to come up with a plan that will insure broad participation in our economy without ending up with a statist mess.  Much of Huckabee’s programme was aimed in that direction, but people were so fixated on his Evangelicalism they frequently lost sight of that.  (Sometimes I fell into that category, but Neal Boortz didn’t!)  It’s time, as they say, to "think outside the box."

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