Palin-Biden: The Debate Nobody Wants?

After Republican hand-wringing on whether Sarah Palin is “ready for prime time,” this endorsement from the Obama camp:

Obama campaign manager David Plouffe told reporters Saturday that Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, the Republican vice presidential nominee, is “a terrific debater” who could give Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Joe Biden (D-Del.) a run for his money when they meet Thursday.

“We’ve looked at tapes of Gov. Palin’s debates, and she’s a terrific debater,” Plouffe told reporters on a conference call. “She has performed very, very well. She’s obviously a skilled speaker. We expect she’ll give a great performance next Thursday. “

The single vice presidential debate will be at 9 p.m. Eastern on Thursday at Washington University in St. Louis.

Lowering expectations is a common campaign practice before a debate. But the Obama campaign’s claims will surprise the Republicans who have begun to fear the debate following Palin’s performance in network interviews. The Obama campaign says they have nothing to worry about.

It’s an interesting match-up: Palin, as a governor, frankly doesn’t have a great deal of foreign policy experience.  (That, BTW, is a constitutional limitation.)  Biden, with all of his alleged experience from the Senate, is almost as gaffe-prone as Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams.  And readers of this blog know how serious that is…

I think everybody’s worrying about this one.

From a purely personal standpoint, I think that being Palin’s foreign policy advisor would be a terrific job.  She has the small-town, people-reading skills (some of those honed in a church setting) that many of the pseudosophisticates we have in the upper reaches of our government lack.  What she needs is someone who can clearly brief her on the players and the scorecard.  What would really be great, though, is for someone to open her eyes as to what the Bible really has to say about Middle Eastern politics.  Had someone been able to do this with George Bush, we could have avoided much of the drag-out we’ve gone through with “democracy in the Middle East” in Iraq.

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