Today, they leave California. Tomorrow, they leave…

I’ve gotten a good deal of bad blowback from Californians about this site, but evidently things in the Golden State aren’t “peaches and cream” for everyone:

The number of people leaving California for another state outstripped the number moving in from another state during the year ending on July 1, 2008. California lost a net total of 144,000 people during that period — more than any other state, according to census estimates. That is about equal to the population of Syracuse, N.Y.

The state with the next-highest net loss through migration between states was New York, which lost just over 126,000 residents.

It’s unsurprising that this is taking place, given the taxation and regulatory environment of the state, to say nothing of its activist judiciary.  And it’s something that’s been going on for a long time, only now it’s accelerated.

And it’s not just an exodus of people, either.  Businesses go too, and even ministries.  There was an exodus of those too, like Focus on the Family, which migrated to Colorado Springs, only to run into California-style LGBT activists like Tim Gill.  (I always thought moving to a place like Colorado was ill-advised; they should have considered a place where evangelicals are better entrenched.)

But that illustrates the downside of California emigration: the Californians take their high government service, high regulation, and NIMBY prissyness (along with other forms of prissyness) with them.  That’s why we have now-blue states such as Nevada and Colorado.  (We’re seeing the same problem in the East in places such as Virginia and North Carolina, only coming from places like that “next-highest loss” leader, New York.)

It used to be that people who moved to more conservative places did so, in part, to get away from the left-wing idea of life and government.  I knew of one Georgia state legislator who left his start in Long Island to find a place where he could home school his children, and he took his conservative view all the way through his years in Atlanta.  That’s one reason why we have had red states in places where there’s been a great deal of immigration from other parts of the country.  But now we’re seeing people who are far too deep into the “blue state mentality” move into places to escape the consequences of that kind of idea, only to take it with them.

But this is a big country, so let’s project this beyond just state-to-state migration.  I believe that we will start seeing the land of immigrants become the land of emigrants as people who are tired of a country that increasingly has the form of economic and religious freedom but denies the power thereof decide to do what their ancestors did: leave.  That’s especially true if the new administration’s plan to reinflate the economy tanks (or doesn’t proceed fast enough to satisfy this impatient electorate.)  And that trend will be accelerated when our government’s policies make it impossible for parents to raise their children the way that they know God wants them to.  How these new emigrants will fare coming from a place with a lacklustre educational system in general and really poor foreign language skills in particular is another story, but chances are the home schoolers will be the first to bail anyway, so they can make more rapid adjustments.

Isn’t this “new world order” a scream?

One thought on “Today, they leave California. Tomorrow, they leave…”

  1. Another factor: as Europe continues to Islamize itself more liberal Europeans are emigrating to the US, and bringing their secular socialism with them. This will increase in the future.

    Of course, conservatives tend to have more children than liberals. Which is another factor to take into account.

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