Revolution in Iran is Easier Said Than Done

There’s a persistent liberal drumbeat out there that, somehow, the current regime in Iran is about to be overthrown.

Iran’s current power holders are taking no chances:

Police chief Gen. Ismail Ahmadi Moghaddam made a harsh threat to protesters to stay off the streets.

“In dealing with previous protests, police showed leniency. But given that these opponents are seeking to topple (the ruling system), there will be no mercy,” Moghaddam said, according to IRNA. “We will take severe action. The era of tolerance is over. Anyone attending such rallies will be crushed.”

And recent history is on their side.  Consider what happened in the wake of the 1979 revolution, as documented in David Pryce-Jones’ The Closed Circle:

Uninhibited by Western education, unfamiliar with Western concepts of human rights, Ayatollah Khomeini quite correctly perceived himself challenged, as once he had been the challenger; and he was determined not to be brought down as the Shah had but to respond in a manner so exemplary that there could be no mistaking his will.  Capturing the state, he had no intention of then allowing it to disintegrate…

The process whereby Khomeini had his position first challenged and then confirmed was very close indeed to civil war, as described by the historian Walter Laqueur:

In 1981 Ayatollah Khomeini’s former allies from the left, the mujahedeen [fighters] and some other groups, turned against the new rulers of Iran.  They were many and experienced; within three months they succeeded in killing the prime minister, many chiefs of police, half the government and the executive committee of the ruling party, not to mention dozens of members of parliament.  Perhaps never before had a terrorist onslaught been so massive and so successful.  Yet within another three months, the terrorists either were dead or had escaped abroad.  The government acted with great brutality; it killed without discrimination; it extracted information by means of torture; it refused as a matter of principle to extend medical help to injured terrorists…

Towards the end of 1983, it became clear that internal groups with a potential for challenging Shia supremacy on ethic or secular or tribal grounds had been smashed, and their leaders were all dead or in exile, their peoples truly cowed.

There’s no doubt that this victory is firmly implanted in the minds of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and his colleagues in the government, which explains the ruthless method they are going about crushing the current dissent.  For the dissidents to achieve victory will require substantive foreign assistance, and there’s no sign that’s forthcoming.

Jesus Christ is Enthroned as King. In Lithuania.

Communism teaches hard lessons:

Jesus Christ is “king” of a municipality in Lithuania.

The aldermen of a small city in Lithuania, a country with strong Catholic majorities, have “enthroned Jesus Christ as King” to their community, hoping to boost the morale of the population in this time of economic crisis.

“Enthrone Jesus Christ as King of our municipality, solemnly declare that he is our sovereign and protector,” said Mayor Zdzislav Palevic of Šalčininkai (southeast), as quoted by Baltic news agency BNS .

“During this difficult period for the country when crisis affects the world, the role of Christ becomes important not only in the personal lives of people, but also in political and cultural life,” proclaims the act of induction, which was adopted unanimously.

“This decision couldn’t hurt. The area is very Catholic, and if it can encourage people to respect the Ten Commandments, then why not?” Leonard Stancikiene, one of 25 city council members, told Agence France-Presse by telephone.

This town of about 7,000 people, mostly ethnic Poles, is located about fifty kilometres south of Vilnius,  the first Lithuanian city to have entrusted its fate to Jesus Christ. In an act approved last 12 June, the Vilnius region was placed under the protection of Christ “to avoid painful mistakes, dangers and threats”.

Lithuania, a former Soviet republic which became independent in 1990 and a member of the EU in 2004, is a secular state, but the Catholic religion remains a vital component of the country.

Before the swearing in of new President Dalia Grybauskaite, the bishop of Vilnius, Archbishop Audrys Backis, delivered a speech to parliament. Solemn masses are usually celebrated at major national holidays.

HT to the Salon Beige.

Merry Christmas: When the Scripture Readings Don’t Quite Cut It

With this, I wish all of my readers a very Merry Christmas.

Beyond that, anyone whose is or was in a liturgical church knows that part of the liturgy is to read appropriate scriptures (like this one for this time of year.)  The idea is that the scriptures be really appropriate.  However, when the liturgy isn’t followed, this breaks down, as a friend on Facebook found out when reading these scriptures to his children:

So I start reading for our Advent readings: “In those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree…” After I said “Augustus,” E. starts moaning and by the end of the sentence she is weeping. I stopped and asked her what was wrong. D. explained that whenever one of E.’s fish died, she would have a burial ceremony and when she asked J. to read from Scripture, this was always the passage he chose.

That is the best reason why I posted the 1662 Book of Common Prayer.

The Discipline and Reform of the Church

Fr. Greg’s response to my diatribes has been there for a while, but with current exigencies here and some technical issues to resolve re this blog (when you’re self-hosted, you have to deal with these things) has delayed a response.

Some of the items he brings up–especially concerning the authority and nature of the church–we’ve actually discussed before, as you can see here.  There are two specific issues that I’d like to address, and those are the discipline and the reform of the church.  Much of the dialogue has centred around people who have been out of sorts with either Roman Catholicism or Russian Orthodoxy, and that represents my concerns, which have haunted me since I took my leave from the former.

Let me start with this:

Church discipline is exercised in order to bring someone to repentance and thereby, to eternal life, never to deprive anyone of eternal life. Remember that if the Eucharist is received unworthily, such reception, far from bringing the receiver closer to God, does just the opposite, subjects the one who so receives to Divine Judgement, and endangers their participation in eternal life (I Cor. 11:27-32). Also, in all the Apostolic Churches, all Church discipline ends at the time of death; the person in question is released into the hands of the ultimate judge, Jesus Christ himself. As further evidence of this, all priests are duty bound, in the case of danger of death, to administer the last sacraments to anyone, regardless of standing with the Church, at the least sign of repentance (construed in the most general of terms): all disciplinary bets are off (or, if the person is unconscious, the priest is to presume repentance and so to administer anointing and absolution). Further, the question of infallibility doesn’t real enter into questions of discipline per se. Thus, your numbered points are at best a caricature.

All other things being equal, this is true.  But they aren’t.  There are two reasons in particular why history shows that this isn’t always followed the way it should be.

The first is state involvement.  If the state decides that it has an interest in the suppression of heresy, pastoral considerations such as you outline above can go out the window.  That was all too evident with both the Old Believers and the Jansenists, to say nothing of the Christological controversies (now I know you’re in league with Peter the Fuller!)  That’s something that we don’t see as much of as we used to, but it still happens.

Of more interest in our own time is when the church decides to “keep up with the Joneses,” i.e. follow modern trends.  That was certainly the case with the Old Believers, and the Jansenists too.  The Jesuits wanted to present a faith that they felt was acceptable to the people of their time, and austere Jansenism was in the way of that.  So Port-Royal was razed.

I think it’s also worth noting that, with Roman Catholicism, its solicitousness to bring people back to orthodoxy can easily turn into an endurance match with the heretics, grinding them down rather than bringing them up.  That’s a legacy of the Inquisition, and Dostoevsky was right in attacking it.

One other thing: the issue of infallibility certainly does come up if the issue involves one of the doctrines which is claimed to be so promulgated.

In our time the worst practitioners of this kind of thing are those who Kendall Harmon refers to as the “reappraisers.”  We’ve seen this kind of thing in the “scorched earth” policies of the TEC.  Those on the left can be very brutal when dispatching their opponents, even if they do it in the name of preserving the “integrity” (double-entendre intended) of the church.

But that leads to my next point.  Let’s look at the following:

Further, while the Churches are always in need of practical reformation (not dogmatic reformation) to one extent or another, our primary task, as individual Christians, is not to reform the Churches, but to cooperate with the Holy Spirit, through the ministry of the Church, in the transformation of each of us as persons so that we conform to the image and likeness of Christ. The fundamental rule of thumb here is Matthew 23: “do what they say but not what they do.” The Christian path has long been laid down: it is simple, but no, it is not easy. So many would seek an easier softer way, and it is so much easier, and more gratifying to remove the speck from your eye than to remove the plank from my own. (Yes, I’m aware of the irony here.)

There are actually two issues here, related but not identical.

The first is the reform of the church.  Tied to that, however, is the mission of the church.  Each and every Christian is obligated by Jesus Christ to be a part of the mission of the church.   The successful implementation of that depends in large part on the opportunity level of the church which the individual believer faces.  If that church is relatively inert, if that inertia is buttressed by institutionalism, if that institutionalism encourages a low level of participation, then the believer isn’t going to be what God intended for him or her to be.  My main experience here is with Roman Catholicism, but it isn’t restricted to that church.  The whole Wesleyan secession could have been avoided if the Church of England, lead by its Governor, had properly released the enthusiasm which Wesley and his friends had exhibited.  Institutionalism isn’t restricted to a church which considers itself a formal mediator between man and God, but a church which has that high a view of itself is more prone to justify itself on institutional grounds than one that doesn’t.  Many moves towards reform are tied to people who wish to see the fulfilment of their own divine purpose on earth, and don’t see the opportunities to do so at hand.

It’s certainly possible for one to live a good and holy life without reaching out and working to reform the church around them.  That’s one reason why I caution Evangelicals about being so quick to judge people in Anglican, Catholic and Orthodox churches not having a proper relationship with God.  But it isn’t the “whole deal” either.

There’s one more minor point I’d like to make, about this:

Don, what you have written concerning the end of sacrifice assumes that the foundational purpose of sacrifice is dealing with sin.

The forgiveness of sin is a necessary part of sacrifice, but it certainly is not the entire purpose.  Part of the problem with discussing anything with me is that my theology can be composite.  I’ve made it clear that I do not think that salvation solely consists of having one’s name written in the Lamb’s Book of Life.  It also consists of the indwelling of Jesus Christ in us.  That’s an inheritance from my years as a Roman Catholic.

The Sexual Abuse Chickens Come Home to Roost: Bishop Moriarty Resigns

Ireland’s long running sex-abuse scandal in the Catholic Church reaches a turning point:

Bishop of Kildare and Leighlin Dr Jim Moriarty has offered his resignation to Pope Benedict XVI.

The announcement was made in the last few minutes following a meeting between the Bishop and Diocesan priests and staff in Portarlington, Co Laois.

Bishop Moriarty was an auxiliary Bishop of Dublin during some of the years in which the Murphy Commission found that the Archdiocese had covered up cases of clerical child sexual abuse.

Bishop Moriarty has said that there were no grounds for his resignation in what was said about him in the Murphy Report.

The Murphy Commission said that Bishop Moriarty could have asked Archbishop Connell to research the files on Fr Edmondus after complaints about the priest had been received by the Diocese.

Although this has been going on for a long time, it’s taken longer to come to a head in the Republic of Ireland than in the U.S.

Obama’s Health Care Plan Undercuts Civil Marriage

Or so Mike McManus thinks:

While abortion and public plan aspects of health reform have been debated, a far more vexing issue for defenders of the traditional family should be the very substantial marriage penalties buried in the 2,457 page bill moving through Congress.

Indeed, the low and middle income subsidies in the “health insurance exchanges” are stacked against marriage – with penalties of up to 100 percent if a cohabiting couple decides to marry.

Individuals, who do not now have insurance, who have incomes up to $43,500, will be able to buy it at a very low cost due to federal subsidies.

For example, an individual earning $25,000 would pay only $1,538 in insurance premiums. But what if that person is cohabiting with a partner with the same income, and they decide to marry? Their premium is not $3,072, double the cost of one person, but $5,160.

That’s a marriage penalty of $2,084.

In theory, universal health care should take civil marriage out of the picture by ending the need for “partnering” to secure benefits.  That’s one of the reasons why the LGBT community has pushed for same sex civil marriage.

But, because of the nature of the low income subsidies, you actually end up with a marriage penalty.  This is a repeat of many other aspects of our welfare laws that penalise civil marriage for low-income people.

Instead of wasting theirs and everyone else’s time trying to make the state do what it’s “supposed to do” with civil marriage, defenders of “traditional” marriage would do well to work for a divorce–of marriage and the state.  Marriage needs to be strictly “under God” and the sooner the Christian community figures this out the better.

The Canon of the Mass: Canon “C”

The form and structure of liturgies is something that churches which employ these in worship either take for granted or argue over intensely. But very few people understand how a) these came into being or b) how they should be revised or replaced in times of liturgical change. What kind of theology is embodied in a liturgy? What attention to the rhythm and metre is given? How will a liturgy work in a language other than one the one it’s written in? How well does a liturgy communicate its message, in addition to being the setting for the “sacred pledge” of the Eucharist? All of these important questions frequently get the short shrift, either by defenders of an existing liturgy of by proposers of a new one?

Liturgical change is the time when these questions do get asked the most. Probably the most important liturgical transition of the last one hundred years took place when the Roman Catholic Church promulgated the Novus Ordo Missae, which was instituted in 1970. That mass was the result of both theological and liturgical forces that had been going on in the Church for most of the preceding century.

Many of those changes—and probably some of the process that led to the NOM—were set forth in Cipriano Vagaggini’s book The Canon of the Mass and Liturgical Reform. Published in 1967, it is a careful and thorough treatment of the subject, and probably represents the thinking of those in charge of the liturgical reform initiated by Vatican II.

The focus of his work is the anaphora, which is, by Vagaggini’s definition, “the liturgical text which accompanies and expresses the offering of the Church’s sacrifice to the Father.” The RCC had used the Roman Canon for nearly fourteen centuries and, while Vagaggini is careful to underline the importance of the Roman Canon to the life of the Church, he is also clear that it has its defects as well.

In this series (which starts here,) we will reproduce the various historical anaphorae he sets forth, plus two Projects “B” and “C” which are his proposals (or perhaps those at the Vatican in the process of formulating the then really “new” NOM) for new anaphorae to be used in the church. Vagaggini also has extensive explanations for all of this; consult the book for these.

I will reproduce the English translations of these anaphorae only. Serious liturgists would do well to consult his original Latin, as the translations look like they were taken from the Italian without consideration of the original Latin text. I have tried to winnow out errors in the OCR process but, if you find some, please bring them to my attention.

A general overview of this topic can be found here.

(Here ends the fixed portion of the introduction; the variable portion follows.)

Our last anaphora is Vagaggini’s “Canon C,” which has a fixed preface, and which is “…to be used ad libitum on sundays of the year, and in those masses which do not have a proper preface .” It presents the history of salvation, which we saw in some of the ancient canons.

I

1-5 It is good and fitting, and for our salvation, to give glory to you; to offer thanks at all times, in every place, to you, Lord,

6 holy Father,

7 almighty and eternal God,

8 through Christ our Lord.

9 Through him you have enabled us to acknowledge the truth

10-12 that we might humbly adore you above all things, Father of eternal glory, with your Son and the Holy Spirit;

13 that in proclaiming you, Love itself beyond all telling, 14 we might love you with undying gladness of heart.

15 It is in him. your only Son.

16 that you have made all things, visible and invisible,

17 in order that he be first among all men;

18 and all creation is in him;

19 and through him all forever praise your name.

20-21 Through him, therefore, all the choirs of angels adore your eternal glory.

22 the countless saints of heaven worship your eternal majesty.

23 Gathered around your throne

24 with unending joy they sing:

25 Holy,

26 Holy,

27 Holy,

28 Lord, God of all.

29 The heavens and the earth are filled with your glory.

30 Hosanna in the heights of heaven.

31 Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.

32 Hosanna in the heights of heaven.

II

33 You are indeed, Lord, holy:

34 truly you have filled heaven and earth

35 with the wonder of your glory.

36 In the beginning you made man out of earth,

37 made him in your image, like to yourself;

38-43 so that, having subjected all living things to him, the wonders of your world are his to rule; all that you have made is a gift in trust, and at all times he adores you in the wonders of your works.

44 After his fall from the life of grace

45 you did not cease to favour him

46 so that he still searched for you:

47 in your goodness, through the Law and the prophets, you led him by the hand to the Saviour.

48 You loved the world so much. holy Father,

49 that you sent you only Son to be our Saviour,

50 that you might love in us what you have always loved in the Son.

51 Conceived through the Holy Spirit in the virgin Mary,

52 he has brought back to us, in abundance,

53 the gifts we lost in the first Adam.

54 He loved us to the end;

55-56 thus, through the Holy Spirit he offered himself to you, a blameless Victim,

57 fulfilling in himself what the sacrifices of old prefigured,

58 and once for all gained our eternal redemption.

59 He arose from the dead in glory,

60 ascended to his place at your right hand,

61 the eternal High Priest, living forever to intercede for us.

62 He will come to judge the living and the dead,

63-64 and we have his promise he will be with us forever.

65 And so, from you, Father, he has sent another Paraclete,

66 the Spirit of truth, to teach us all things

67 and fill the world with all holiness.

III

68 We ask, therefore, most merciful Lord,

69-71 that the Holy Spirit be pleased to fill with the presence of his glory these gifts w.e offer for you to sanctify;

72 through him may they become the body and the blood

73 of your beloved Son, Jesus Christ, our Lord,

74 to be a sacrifice pleasing to you,

75 the sacrifice he demanded we offer you.

IV

76 For he, the day before his passion,

77-78 gave us in trust this great mystery of the new covenant,

79 an everlasting memorial of his marvellous works:

80 in his mercy he ordained before he offered himself on the cross

81 that we too, his humble servants

82 should constantly offer this sacrifice

83 in the mystery of his body and his blood.

84 So when he was about to give himself to die,

85 he took bread in his holy and blessed hands,

86 looking up to heaven, to you, God, his all-powerful Father,

87 he gave thanks, blessed and broke it and gave to his disciples saying:

88 take and eat, all of you:

89 this is my body which shall he given for you.

90 Do this in memory of me.

91 In the same way when they had eaten,

92 he took wine and water in a cup,

93 gave thanks, blessed and gave it to his disciples saying:

94 take and drink,all of you:

95 this is the cup of the new covenant in my blood

96 which shall be poured out for you and for everyone

97 to take away all sins.

98 Do this in memory of me.

V

99 Therefore, Lord,

100 we your servants, and your holy people,

101 remember the glorious passion of your Son,

102 his wonderful resurrection and ascension into heaven;

103 thus, while we await his second coming,

104 we confidently approach the throne of your loving mercy;

105-106 we thank you, we offer you this bloodless sacrifice, the gift which you yourself have given us :

107 the pure Victim,

108 the holy, blameless Victim.

109 the victim given that the world might live.

VI

110 We beg you, eternal Lord,

111 receive this Victim, for you desired our salvation through his intercession.

112 Look with kindness on the offering of your Church,

113 an offering made holy by the work of your Spirit.

114 Accept it, we pray;

115 grant, in your goodness, that as many of us as receive the body and blood of your Son,

116 may be filled with this Holy Spirit;

117 may we become in him one body, one spirit.

118 May he make us an eternal offering to you,

119 that we may come to the lasting inheritance the saints enjoy.

VII

120 Above all in company with the blessed, glorious, and ever-virgin Mary,

121 mother of our God and Lord, Jesus Christ;

122 with blessed Joseph and John the Baptist,

123 your holy apostles Peter and Paul,

124 saint N. (patron of the diocese), saint N. (saint of the day), and all your saints; [in Masses which are not de sanctis the individual priest—or community—may here insert a saint’s name of his own choice.]

125 we trust that through their merits and prayers we shall receive your help, as they plead on our behalf.

VIII

126 Remember, Lord, your holy Church throughout the entire world,

127 for which we offer this saving Victim.

128 Be pleased to gather your people from every place on earth and protect them,

129 with your servant our Pope N., and all the bishops of the world,

130 our own bishop .N., and the holy people you have redeemed.

IX

131 We pray, Lord, accept

132 the petitions and prayers of those who have made this offering

133 and all those here present, who offer this sacrifice of praise to make amends.

134 Wipe away their sins through these holy mysteries, 135 and. in your kindness. cleanse them

136 that they may receive forever the gift of your faithful love.

X

137-8 Look on us, ministers at your altar, with mercy, Lord, for we too are sinners.

139 Accept our service kindly,

140 grant that our lives may be true to the mystery we celebrate.

XI

141 Remember also, Lord, those men and women, your servants, who have died

142 marked with the sign of faith,

143 and rest in the peace of Christ.

144 Let them enter, we pray, that place of eternal joy and light,

145 where we hope one day to enjoy with them the everlasting vision of your glory.

XII

146 Through Christ, our Lord,

147 through whom you give all gifts to the world, [when food is blessed here, there is said: …through whom you ever create all things, and they are good, you make them holy, you endow them with life, you bless them, and you offer them to us.]

148 through him,

149 with him,

150 and in him

151-3 be all honour and glory, to you, God the almighty Father, one with the Holy Spirit,

154 forever and ever. Amen.

The Canon of the Mass: Canon “B”

The form and structure of liturgies is something that churches which employ these in worship either take for granted or argue over intensely. But very few people understand how a) these came into being or b) how they should be revised or replaced in times of liturgical change. What kind of theology is embodied in a liturgy? What attention to the rhythm and metre is given? How will a liturgy work in a language other than one the one it’s written in? How well does a liturgy communicate its message, in addition to being the setting for the “sacred pledge” of the Eucharist? All of these important questions frequently get the short shrift, either by defenders of an existing liturgy of by proposers of a new one?

Liturgical change is the time when these questions do get asked the most. Probably the most important liturgical transition of the last one hundred years took place when the Roman Catholic Church promulgated the Novus Ordo Missae, which was instituted in 1970. That mass was the result of both theological and liturgical forces that had been going on in the Church for most of the preceding century.

Many of those changes—and probably some of the process that led to the NOM—were set forth in Cipriano Vagaggini’s book The Canon of the Mass and Liturgical Reform. Published in 1967, it is a careful and thorough treatment of the subject, and probably represents the thinking of those in charge of the liturgical reform initiated by Vatican II.

The focus of his work is the anaphora, which is, by Vagaggini’s definition, “the liturgical text which accompanies and expresses the offering of the Church’s sacrifice to the Father.” The RCC had used the Roman Canon for nearly fourteen centuries and, while Vagaggini is careful to underline the importance of the Roman Canon to the life of the Church, he is also clear that it has its defects as well.

In this series (which starts here,) we will reproduce the various historical anaphorae he sets forth, plus two Projects “B” and “C” which are his proposals (or perhaps those at the Vatican in the process of formulating the then really “new” NOM) for new anaphorae to be used in the church. Vagaggini also has extensive explanations for all of this; consult the book for these.

I will reproduce the English translations of these anaphorae only. Serious liturgists would do well to consult his original Latin, as the translations look like they were taken from the Italian without consideration of the original Latin text. I have tried to winnow out errors in the OCR process but, if you find some, please bring them to my attention.

A general overview of this topic can be found here.

(Here ends the fixed portion of the introduction; the variable portion follows.)

Here we veer away from the ancient liturgies and look at Vagaggni’s own “Canon B, “ “with a movable preface to be used ad libitum in the Masses with a proper preface.”

I

It is good and fitting. ..

Holy. . . Hosanna in the heights of heaven.

II

1 You are indeed holy, Lord,

2 and it is right that your creation

3 gives you unending praise

4 with a voice proclaiming forever

5 that the heavens and earth are filled with the wonders of your glory;

6 for through your Son, Jesus Cnrist, our Lord,

7 and through the life of the Spirit within us

8 vou make all things -live. all things holy.

III

9 We ask, therefore, most merciful Lord,

10 be pleased to bless these gifts, and make them holy,

11 gifts which we offer for you to sanctify.

12 We pray you, bid your Spirit in his strength, to enter them

13 by the power of your Anointed, our Lord,

14 so that they become, for us, his body and his blood,

15 a sacrifice pleasing to you

16 such as he demanded we offer you.

IV

17 For he, the day before his passion,

18-19 gave us in trust this great mystery of the new covenant,

20 an everlasting memorial of his marvellous works:

21-22 in his mercy he ordained before he offered himself on the cross that we too, his humble servants

23 should constantly offer this sacrifice

24 in the mystery of his body and his blood.

25 So, when he was about to give himself to die,

26 he took bread in his holy and blessed hands,

27 looking up to heaven, to you, God, his all-powerful Father,

28 he gave thanks, blessed and broke it: and gave to his disciples saying:

29 take and eat, all of you:

30 this is my body which shall be given for you.

31 Do this in memory of me.

32 In the same way when they had eaten,

33 he took wine and water in a cup,

34 gave thanks, blessed and gave it to his disciples saying:

35 take and drink, all of you:

36 this is the cup of the new covenant in my blood

37 which shall be poured out for you and for everyone

38 to take away all sins.

39 Do this in memory of me.

V

40-42 Therefore, Lord, we your servants, and your holy people, remember the glorious passion of your Son,

43 his wonderful resurrection and ascension into heaven;

44 thus, while we await his second coming,

45 we confidently approach the throne of your loving mercy;

46 we thank you, we offer you this gift which you yourself have given us,

47 this bloodless sacrifice:

48 the pure Victim,

49-50 the holy, blameless Victim,

the Victim given that the world might live.

VI

51 We beg you, eternal Lord,

52-57 receive this Victim, for you desired our salvation through his intercession. Look with kindness on the offering of your Church, an offering made holy by the work of your Spirit. Accept it, we pray; grant, in your goodness, that as many of us as receive the body and blood of your Son, may be filled with this Holy Spirit;

58 may we become in him one body, one spirit.

59 May he make us an eternal offering to you,

60 that we may come to the lasting inheritance the saints enjoy;

VII

61 above all in company with the blessed, glorious, and ever-virgin Mary,

62 mother of our God and Lord, Jesus Christ;

63 with blessed Joseph and John the Baptist,

64 your holy apostles Peter and Paul,

65 saint N. (patron of the diocese), saint N. (saint of the day), and all your saints; [in Masses which are not de sanctis the individual priest—or community—may here insert a saint’s name of his own choice]

66 we trust that through their merits and prayers we shall receive your help, as they plead on our behalf.

VIII

67 Remember, Lord, your holy Church throughout the entire world,

68 for which we offer this saving Victim.

69 Be pleased to gather your people from every place on earth and protect them,

70 with your servant our Pope N., and all the bishops of the world,

71 our own Bishop N., and the holy people you have redeemed.

IX

72-73 We pray, Lord, accept the petitions and prayers of those who have made this offering and all those here present,

74 who offer this sacrifice of praise to make amends.

75 Wipe away their sins through these holy mysteries,

76 and, in your kindness, cleanse them

77 that they may receive forever the gifts of your faithful love.

X

78-79 Look on us, ministers at your altar, with mercy, Lord, for we too are sinners.

80 Accept our service kindly,

81 grant that our lives may be true to the mystery we celebrate.

XI

82-84 Remember also, Lord, those men and women, your servants, who have died, marked with the sign of faith, and rest in the peace of Christ.

85 Let them enter, we pray, that place of eternal joy and light,

86 where we hope one day to enjoy with them the everlasting vision of your glory.

XII

87 Through Christ, our Lord,

88 through whom you give all gifts to the world,

[when food is blessed here, there is said: . . . through whom you ever create all things, and they are good, you make them holy, you endow them with life, you bless them, and you offer them to us.]

89 through him,

90 with him,

91 and in him

92 be all honour and glory,

93 to you, God the almighty Father,

94 one with the Holy Spirit,

95 for ever and ever.

Amen.

Calling the Police on Santa Claus

Only in the UK…

The children detained in the Yarl’s Wood Immigration Removal Centre are lost somewhere in the UK’s asylum system.  There more about this strange business here.

“Santa Claus” is in reality the Rev. Canon James Rosenthal, a world class authority on the original “St. Nick,” St. Nicholas of Myra.  I love the Anglican blessing of the toys; perhaps that’s what takes place before the sleigh takes off.

HT to Anglicans Online.

Using Jesus, Joseph and Mary to Encourage Census Participation

This is another one of those “I thought I had seen everything” kind of moments:

In an effort to encourage participation in the Census, the National Association of Latino Elected Officials is distributing this poster (mostly in Spanish) to churches nationwide:

Rev. Miguel Rivera, who heads the National Coalition of Latino Clergy and Christian Leaders, calls it “blasphemous.” The Washington Post quoted him on his radio show as saying, “The Census would never do the same thing using the name of Muhammed during Ramadan.”

In a country whose elites are as hell-bent on excising religion from public life as ours are, this is a doozy of an effort.  (And I use that expression knowledgeably; my grandfather was a Dusenberg dealer.)