Easter Greetings, Russian (and Technical) Style

Over the years, I’ve come to associate Easter with the Russians.  It’s an odd thing; it started with the discovery of the traditional Russian Easter greeting (which I duly exchanged with a Muscovite friend this weekend.)  That was accentuated by the discovery of Christianity’s comeback during the “Great Patriotic War” (Visit to Zagorsk) and the “resurrection” of the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour (Rising From the Pool) which Stalin had demolished in 1931.

Back in 1989 I even put it in Russian on a technical paper on vibratory pile driving equipment (which the Russians first developed in around the time of same Great Patriotic War.)  Note it in the upper left hand corner:

The Orthodox (and those who are influenced by them)  put a great deal of emphasis on the Resurrection, and justifiably so.  The Russians’ name for Sunday is “Resurrection Day,” which is far more than we can manage in English.

But to put it into English anyway:

CHRIST HAS ARISEN!  HE HAS TRULY ARISEN!

One thought on “Easter Greetings, Russian (and Technical) Style”

  1. There could be different practices in Orthodox churches and Russian style. As long as the practices do not contradict the Scripture, they have to be accepted.

    I give you a simple example. A person always brushes his teeth from left to right and another always brushes his teeth right to left. Are there anything wrong with these two persons? Nothing is wrong with them since both of them have their own ways to maintain their mouths to be hygienic.

    The same is for these two groups of people. Each group of Christians practise differently. As long as their practices do not contradict the Scripture, their practices are acceptable to God.

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