Katharine Jefferts-Schori: From Litigious to Practical, From Pathetic to Prophetic

This is what she tells the part of the Diocese of Pittsburgh she got to keep:

Although the two churches battled over property in court, Jefferts Schori said she foresees a day when churches will become something different.

“More faith communities will decide not to have a permanent dedicated structure in the coming years,” she said. “They can be a blessing if they are used all the time, but many of them are only used on Sunday mornings. Is that an effective use of the resource?”

Some churches do hold services in other buildings or in homes.

She’s right about that.  The utilisation of church physical plant isn’t a very efficient use of resources, not at least the way most churches use it.  And with the iffy status of Christianity in Western societies, the ability of churches to hold property may become very problematic.

But that begs the obvious dumb question: why did she drop millions of her church’s money into property defence when she’d have been better off cutting a deal?

Sounds like the classic case of too soon old and too late smart…

2 thoughts on “Katharine Jefferts-Schori: From Litigious to Practical, From Pathetic to Prophetic”

  1. My parents are planting a church, and I spent my morning talking to my mom about this very issue. Here in Chicago, it’s very difficult to come by a church building that you can use 24/7. But if you rent one for Sundays, it’s almost as if you’re meeting in a home- you have no publicity and no consistent meeting place. My parents plan on renting a storefront that they can use 24/7 to hold events (as well as a sign) and build community.

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