In a Rich Kid World, Secret Service Agents are the Hired Help

Had former Secret Service agent Dan Emmett been raised in a place like Palm Beach, he would have seen this coming:

In several anecdotes, former agent Dan Emmett revealed that Clinton’s young staff had “fundamental traits of rudeness and arrogance” that teetered on the verge of being dangerous at times. “Most of these youngsters were from wealthy families, and many viewed Secret Services agents as the hired help,” he writes in “Within Arms’s Length,” an autobiography that provides new details of the inner Secret Service.

Technically speaking, the young snobs were right: Secret Service agents are the hired help.  However, wisdom dictates that someone whose job is to protect you and your boss from bodily harm and is well trained to do so should get some respect, but, as Emmett rightly points out, that wisdom is lacking amongst the children of the beautiful.

Building loyalty amongst a staff requires that, while knowing they’re being paid to work for you, you as their boss give them the respect they deserve and, within the economic limitations of the situation, the compensation to go with it.  Failure to do so both ways will result over time in a demoralised staff that leaves, doesn’t perform up to standard or in some cases turns on their superiors.

The immediate result will be the rich kids sighing the old Palm Beach lament: “Good help is so hard to find these days…”

With Secret Service agents and others charged with defence of the government and its officials, the long term result may well be something far more sinister, and the evidence is out there the left has been trying to deal with that.  In the meanwhile, it’s something to think about, snobs, as you deal with those who are serving you.  As I like to say, be good to the people you meet on the way up: you’ll see them again on the way down.

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