Prolonged Detention, and the Way of All Revolutions

Of all people, Rachel Maddow, on of all networks, MSNBC, calls this one-speech volte-face by Barack Obama for what it is:

This country is, in many ways, in the course of a long revolution that started with the 1960’s.  (For a country always in a hurry, we can’t even get a revolution resolved in 40-50 years)!  But in this respect, all revolutions are the same: they start with a cry for freedom and end up destroying that freedom in the name of their own self-righteous view.  That’s what happened in France, it’s what happened in Russia and China, and it’s what’s happening now in this country.

The Guantanamo inmates should have been put in a military tribunal and processed.  It was the serious mistake of George W. Bush that he did not.  Barack Obama started out by promising to close Guantanamo, but he did not.  Then he wanted to try certain people in civilian court in, of all places, New York.  I think he wanted to do that to expose them to the technicalities of American civilian process, get them acquitted or off on one of those technicalities, and then use that as a justification to release the rest of them.

That didn’t work either.  In the meanwhile Barack Obama has found his “inner Lenin”, a person that the American left has, at no small cost to itself, tried to keep out.  Now he wants indefinite prolonged detention of those not to our government’s taste, and supposing that’s restricted to Muslim radicals is naïve.

We still have an electoral process to fix problems like this.  For the moment.  But revolutions have a way of getting rid of those also, don’t they?

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