The Core Issue Isn’t Gun Control, But Government Distrust

That’s Scott Rasmussen’s idea, and he asks a lot of nosey questions:

If people trusted the government, there would be no reason to be concerned about background checks, but only one-in-five voters believe the government currently has the consent of the governed.

Half the nation views the federal government as a threat to individual liberties rather than a protector of those rights. Sixty-five percent (65%) recognize that the purpose of Second Amendment gun control rights is protection against tyranny, and 44% believe it’s likely the government will try to confiscate all privately owned guns over the next generation.

This helps explain why the legislation is struggling in Congress. People like the idea of background checks but don’t think they’ll make much difference. They’re also suspicious about the motives of those in government.

In the end, those who would like to see stronger federal restrictions on gun ownership should start by supporting reforms that will enable the government to re-earn the trust of the American people.

I don’t ask nosey questions for a living like Scott Rasmussen, but that was my point in my New Year’s piece on gun control:

What we really need first is a government we can trust, and as long as the Boomers are in charge, that isn’t going to happen.

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