No, They're Not Scientists, Either

And some will admit it:

Many more in the Republican Party love using this line, “I’m not a scientist.” Marco Rubio, John Boehner, and Rick Scott, have all used versions of this line to dismiss climate change science or promote creationism. In 2012, asked how old Earth is, Rubio repeated, “I’m not a scientist,” twice. In May, Boehner said “I’m not qualified to debate the science,” when asked for his views on climate change. Scott’s answer to whether climate change is real and a problem was also, “I’m not a scientist.” That comment earned Scott enough criticism that he agreed to a 30-minute meeting with climate scientists. (In the energy policy he released on Wednesday, Jindal calls global warming “a religion for many on the Left,” which he accuses of lacking a “scientific way of approaching public policy.”)

This election cycle, some Republicans are finally using their heads to defang their opponents.  One such extraction that has many upset is the proposal to make birth control pills over the counter, which would certainly widen their availability. It would also delegitimise their being paid for by the state (what about that government sponsored aspirin?) and that upsets those for whom that subsidy has been a fixation.

In this case, the Republicans are using one of the sorrier aspects of American politics to sidetrack an equally unscientific media:  Americans, by and large, have an allergy of electing people with scientific backgrounds to higher office.  That is embodied in the concept that a Harvard law school product can become the “scientific” President.

Same “scientific” President had a comeback, though:

“…I’m not a doctor either, but if a bunch of doctors tell me that tobacco can cause lung cancer then I”ll say, ‘OK! It’s not that hard. I’m not a scientist, but I read the science.”

Last I heard, he still sneaks a cigarette now and then.

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