The Episcopalians: Trying to Change History While Missing What’s Important

In the middle of a post on her “Rip van Winkle” return to Seattle, Julia Duin makes this observation about growing up Episcopalian:

In high school, we had just moved to Seattle from Maryland, where there was so much social ferment. It even affected the Episcopal church we attended in Severna Park, which was close to Annapolis. I found a letter in the scrapbooks from a friend explaining she had left St. Martins (as had numerous other families) because of its emphasis on politics. The Episcopal church got really into the anti-war movement during that time period. What they missed was the burgeoning Jesus movement that was also happening. I returned to that church when I was a junior in high school and challenged the priest as to why, after 5 years there, I had not heard about the Jesus I encountered later in Young Life at Redmond High School. He felt the message had been there but I had not heard it. I didn’t challenge him at the time, but actually, the message wasn’t there.

The message really wasn’t there, as I discuss in this post about John Stott.   What I was getting was this kind of thing, by a school chaplain who ended up on the Left Cost.  Those who were “Jesus freaks” (or even more conventional Southern evangelicals) either laid very low or were attacked at my Episcopal prep school.  It made swimming the Tiber a lot better cover for what was going on in my life, something Hillary Clinton’s people figured out in this last election cycle.

Duin opens with one of the best descriptions of left-wing gentrification I’ve seen, which is one reason I support #Calexit.

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