Category Archives: Evangelical and Pentecostal Stuff

What you would expect from a site like this.

If You Can Lead Sheep, You’re Ready for Politics

I could not pass up this gem from Philo Judaeus, in his Life of a Man Occupied with Affairs of State, or on Joseph, I:

Now, this man (Joseph) began from the time he was seventeen years of age to be occupied with the consideration of the business of a shepherd, which corresponds to political business.  On which account I think it is that the race of poets has been accustomed to call kings the shepherds of the people; for he who is skilful in the business of a shepherd will probably be also a most excellent king, having derived instruction in those matters which are deserving of inferior attention here to superintend a flock of those most excellent of all animals, namely, of men. And just as attention to matters of hunting is indispensable to the man who is about to conduct a war or to govern an army, so in the same banner those who hope to have the government of a city will find the business of a shepherd very closely connected with them, since that is as it were a sort of prelude to any kind of government.

When I worked at Church of Lay Ministries, our last bookkeeper lived on a farm and, as part of that, tended sheep.  The whole concept of a real shepherd working in a Christian organisation was more fun than a human being ought to have, and I made the most of it.  Her response was that sheep are pretty dumb, and comparing people to sheep (a common theme in the New Testament) isn’t very complimentary to people.

Given the current state of American politics, Philo’s words resonate, and one would wish that more American politicians had spent their early years watching over the flocks by night than haunting the halls of ivy.

Philo’s idea also puts this passage in a new light:

And Samuel did all that the Lord told him; and he came to Bethlehem: and the elders of the city were amazed at meeting him, and said, Dost thou come peaceably, thou Seer? And he said, Peaceably: I am come to sacrifice to the Lord. Sanctify yourselves, and rejoice with me this day: and he sanctified Jesse and his sons, and he called them to the sacrifice. And it came to pass when they came in, that he saw Eliab, and said, Surely the Lord’s anointed is before him. But the Lord said to Samuel, Look not on his appearance, nor on his stature, for I have rejected him; for God sees not as man looks; for man looks at the outward appearance, but God looks at the heart. And Jesse called Aminadab, and he passed before Samuel: and he said, Neither has God chosen this one. And Jesse caused Sama to pass by: and he said, Neither has God chosen this one. And Jesse caused his seven sons to pass before Samuel: and Samuel said, the Lord has not chosen these. And Samuel said to Jesse, Hast thou no more sons? And Jesse said, There is yet a little one; behold, he tends the flock. And Samuel said to Jesse, Send and fetch him for we may not sit down till he comes. And he sent and fetched him: and he was ruddy, with beauty of eyes, and very goodly to behold. And the Lord said to Samuel, Arise, and anoint David, for he is good. And Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the midst of his brethren: and the Spirit of the Lord came upon David from that day forward: and Samuel arose, and departed to Armathaim.  (1Samuel 16:4-13 LXX)

God’s choice of David really was based on merit!

Twenty Years of Positive Infinity

A little over twenty years ago I received the following notification from Geocities, the free website provider:

Sat Aug 23 13:59:46 1997…

Welcome, DON, to GeoCities Personal Home Page Program!
Please write down or save the following information for future use.

Your Member Name is: penlay.
Your Neighborhood is: Athens/Parthenon.
Your Address is: 4799.
Your Current Password is: ******

********
NOTE: WE WILL NEVER ASK YOU FOR YOUR PASSWORD. We have access to the database and can get it at any time. Please be sure not to give it out to anyone else.
********

The URL for your Personal Home Page is:
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Parthenon/4799

If you want to change your password use our editor at http://www.geocities.com/homestead/homeprof.html

At this location you can also make all other changes to your account profile, including changing your member name and directory listing.

As noted in a similar anniversary celebration of vulcanhammer.net, it’s an eternity on an internet, but here we are.

Some of the very early history of the site–including some of its graphics–is in our “About” page.   A summary of the site after its conversion to a WordPress blog is here.

The goal of this site has been to be a ministry.  That may seem odd to many people, but from the start I’ve been dissatisfied with a lot of the ministry going on out there.  Most churches and parachurch organisations are good at picking the “low-hanging fruit” but when it comes to more difficult fields they tend to shy away.  Growing up in the complicated religious background that was mine has always impressed me the simple fact that there is a body of people who cannot be reached by the “standard” approaches, no matter what those standard approaches might happen to be.  Reaching some of those people has been the main goal of this site.

It took some time to get a structure put together, but by about the middle of the last decade the basic topical structure of the site was pretty much as it is now; you can see this in the “Categories” list on the left.

At this point, as noted last year, the future is uncertain.  The web’s gatekeepers are beginning to close ranks on dissent to their idea.  How far they will get will depend upon many things.  How this blog and many other Christian sites will fare is not certain either.

When we first moved to Palm Beach, my parents placed me in Palm Beach Public School, whose principal was Clifford Ripley (believe it or not!)  He placed many pithy sayings in the school handbook, one of which was “Today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday; make each day count.”  God has given us one day at a time; we need to make it count while it is still here.  This blog is part of my attempt to do just that the last twenty years; I trust it has been a blessing to you.

The Advocates

Dovetail DOVE 1 (1973)

Inaugural album on the UK’s premier Christian music label of the 1970’s.  As Ken Scott observes, by the time it was released the music is a little behind the times; it’s more of a 1960’s “British Invasion” kind of record in an era when the country was putting out albums that inspired this kind of thing.

This album has two strong points.  First, it’s a fun album, especially now that the “behind times” problem is pretty much moot.  People who want that 1960’s UK sound, with organ, are going to love this album.  The group members were associate evangelists with Youth for Christ, and I’m sure they put on a much livelier performance than their Maranatha counterparts in the U.S. (and I went to a couple of those.)  And it’s an album that expresses the simple joy of loving Jesus and meeting him for the first time that much Christian music that has come after it has sadly lost.

The songs:

  1. Take A Good Look At Yourself
  2. Rise Shine
  3. His Name Is Jesus
  4. No-Man’s Land
  5. Just Jesus And Me
  6. Jumping Jeremiah
  7. Emmanuel
  8. Revolution
  9. Miracle
  10. Alive
  11. Blind Eyes
  12. Rebels Song

The musicians: Dave Kitchen, Stuart Bell, John Hindmarsh and Keith Howard.

DL

For more music click here

The Undemocratic, Procrustean Experiment Strikes Again

As Nick Park points out in his letter to Ireland’s Foreign Minister about the EU’s actions about Christian refugees from Eritrea:

We are alarmed at report recently from contacts in Brussels that the EU is in the process of signing Compact Agreements with third countries which will mean that members states can send back asylum seekers without difficulty.  Our understanding is that this whole process is being carried out in such a manner as to bypass the European Parliament and avoid democratic scrutiny.  We are informed that all member states must be in agreement before a compact agreement is signed.

The problem of undemocratic action is at the core of the problem of the EU itself.  Not only are the ways to evade democratic action multiple, but the EU has taken a “one size fits all” and “my way or the highway” attitude on many issues.  The biggest result of this was Brexit.  In the lead-up to the vote, I noted that the EU was an “undemocratic, Procrustean experiment.”  Many cried at the result but few stopped to think that, had the EU taken a more flexible and open approach to the UK’s concerns, it would have never happened.

The EU has always been sold that it is “the best.”  The best for what? For whom?  Intent to solve Europe’s propensity to plunge itself into conflict is one thing, but just because there’s a cure doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for improvement.

Kell Street Camp Meeting: Dinner and Joy on the Ground

Paula Records LPS 2211 (1972)

“Revival” recordings (audio and video) are common in Christian music.  For Southern Gospel, the best known ones are the “Gaither Homecoming” series, which they did in the 1990’s and 2000’s.  Their idea was to get many of the famous Southern Gospel artists–who were passing away–to perform their music, which made a tremendous impact on American Evangelical Christianity.

You’d think that the urge to do this wasn’t too strong in the 1970’s, when albums such as this were being produced.  The “Jesus Music” featured on this site was little threat to “traditional” Southern Christian music.  Evidently, however, some thought so, and this album was a response to that, although the motivation behind it is not the same as, say, the Gaithers.

This album is a “revival” album in every sense of the word.  The songs are framed in a small Texas town revival, right from building the brush arbor (depicted on the cover) to the altar call and revival closing songs.  In between are some classic hymns.  If they wanted to replicate the uneven, nasal vocals of small Southern congregations, they completely succeeded.  OTOH, although the narration wants to invoke memories of a rural revival, one thing that the “brush arbor”  would need is a good-sized generator: the instrumentation is electric and the drums are prominent, which would have elicited a “tsk tsk” from many Southern evangelicals, rural and urban.

But I suspect that there were other “tsk tsk” moments with this group.  Revival albums are done for two reasons: to keep a style of music and worship so that it stays alive in the church, and to “document” an era that has passed away, both musically and doctrinally.  I get the impression that this is the latter; in fact, the way they do some things both spoken and sung, it borders on satire.  At the end of the album, the narrator laments that his children will never see revival such as this, but that’s more due to this problem than the music having gone out of fashion, or he having moved to town (which Texans did by the droves after World War II.)

The closest thing already on site to this is Glide Memorial’s Bobby Kent, which I prefer because it’s more towards Black Gospel than Southern Gospel.  But if you’re looking for something more on the Scots-Irish side, the Kell Street Campmeeting (that’s the way we’d spell it in the Church of God) should “suit your fancy.”

The songs:

  1. Revive Us Again
  2. Kneel At The Cross
  3. The Great Speckled Bird
  4. Farther Along
  5. Will The Circle Be Unbroken
  6. I Shall Not Be Moved
  7. If We Never Meet Again
  8. Precious Memories
  9. Oh! Why Not Tonight
  10. God Be With You

DL

For more of our music offerings click here

You Could Just Stand There and Look Stupid: An Ascension Day Reflection

Today is Ascension Day, when we celebrate Our Lord’s bodily ascension into heaven.  The Acts of the Apostles describe the “aftermath” on earth as follows:

While they were still gazing up into the heavens, as he went, suddenly two men, clothed in white, stood beside them, And said: “Men of Galilee, why are you standing here looking up into the heavens? This very Jesus, who has been taken from you into the heavens, will come in the very way in which you have seen him go into the heavens.” (Act 1:10-11 TCNT)

For some reason, this reminds me of an encounter I had with one of my students.  This student was unique in many ways.   I found out independently that he had a hard life: abandoned by parents, brother in jail, poverty, but that he had given it his best shot in life and was working on his civil engineering degree (which he completed.)  Helping students like this makes teaching worthwhile.

One day he came to see me in my office.  My office is away from most of the College of Engineering and Computer Science in a building with 24-hour card access.  If you don’t have a card, during the day you can ring the doorbell and be admitted.  He did that and got to my office, but then he asked me a serious question: “What would I do if I didn’t know to ring the doorbell to get in?”

“Well, you could just stand there and look stupid,” I replied.

He thought a second and sad, “I could just stand there and look stupid.”  In spite of this inauspicious start, we had a good meeting.

Every time I read the passage in Acts I cited above, I always think to myself, “You know, those two men were certainly angels, otherwise they would have said, ‘Men of Galilee, why are you standing here looking stupid up into the heavens?'”  Our Lord had just given them instructions as to what they were supposed to be doing:

So, when the Apostles had met together, they asked Jesus this question–“Master, is this the time when you intend to re-establish the Kingdom for Israel?” His answer was: “It is not for you to know times or hours, for the Father has reserved these for his own decision; But you shall receive power, when the Holy Spirit shall have descended upon you, and shall be witnesses for me not only in Jerusalem, but throughout Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” (Act 1:6-8 TCNT)

But they just stood there looking upward until the angel gave them the reality check they needed.

Two thousand years have passed, and many Christians, mesmerized by whatever “spiritual happening” is going on around them, or what’s trendy in the church.  But Our Lord not only gave us a mission; he sent the Holy Spirit to empower us to accomplish that mission.

Our Lord’s messengers were too polite to tell the disciples to quit looking stupid and get on with their task.  But, polite or not, it’s the truth: the mission has not changed, and is still out there for Christians to accomplish it.

The “Favourite Period” for Feminism was also the Favourite Period for Pentecostal Women Ministers

An interesting observation from Camille Paglia on her “favourite period” for feminism:

My favorite period in feminism has always been the 1920s and 1930s, when American women energized by winning the vote gained worldwide prominence for their professional achievements. My early role models, Amelia Earhart and Katharine Hepburn, were fierce individualists and competitors who liked and admired men and who never indulged in the tiresome, snippy rote male-bashing that we constantly hear from today’s feminists.

It was also (not coincidentally) the “golden age” of women ministers in modern Pentecost, a fact which I touched on in my last post.  After 1950, setting women into ministry in Pentecostal churches (in the Church of God at least) went into decline until recent times.

Another thing that experienced a “golden age” in the 1930’s was aviation, where women such as Earhart and Laura Ingalls made their mark.  My grandfather was part of that era and I discuss that–and womens’ achievements there–in more detail here.

What happened?  In short, World War II, which induced many changes into American society that are still not appreciated.  Today we work under a paradigm (or paradigms, some of which are self-contradictory) that really isn’t working for anybody.  A good example of this comes from another observation from Paglia:

The main point here is that we should have had our first woman president way back in the 1990s, but neither Pelosi nor Feinstein, the leading female candidates, chose to run, as even Elizabeth Dole bravely did. There is absolutely no mythical “misogyny” holding back American women from the presidency: for heaven’s sake, the U.S. has had women mayors, senators, and governors for decades now.

We should have had our first women president then, but instead we got that Scots-Irish wonder kid, Bill Clinton.  Had we done so, as head of government she would have been sandwiched between the UK’s Margaret Thatcher and Theresa May, both of whom were or are Tories.  (Even Turkey, Pakistan, Indonesia and Bangladesh, Muslim countries all, have beat us to the punch on this one…)  Something is wrong, but our heated rhetoric confounds our ability to fix it.

Beating the Baptists to the Mission Field

For all the money they’ve sent to Richmond, not much to show for it:

Whatever the overall totals, what’s striking is the continuing size of the U.S. proportion. The largest 40 or so Baptist groups when combined ac­count for around 55 million people, 40 million of whom adhere to bodies in the United States. That compares with 7 million members in Africa, 5 million in Asia, and 2 million in Latin America. Non-U.S. numbers rise if smaller denominations are included, but they count their numbers not in the millions but in the tens of thousands, and applying the same standard also raises U.S. figures comparably.

Jenkins’ explanation of these laggard results doesn’t satisfy.  I would first observe that the “900 pound gorilla” (or 400 kilo gorilla, for those of you really mission minded) in the Baptist world is the Southern Baptist Convention.  That being said, their target home mission field is the Scots-Irish South.  I think that the cultural state of these people is so specific that being successful with them forces a church to adopt a life and method that hinders the communication of the Gospel to just about anyone else.

That hasn’t stopped people like Billy Graham, probably the best known Southern Baptist on the planet, from using his background as a springboard for world evangelisation.  The SBC gave him roots and wings, and he flew; the basic problem with Southern Baptists (and many others in this culture) is that they are stuck in the roots and lack the wings to fly.

In the South, the teetotalling Baptists did more than anyone else to make that Southern eating institution, the cafeteria, great.  Since the Baptists became punctual at ending their services, if the rest of us got there first for whatever reason, we told each other that we “beat the Baptists to the cafeteria.”  Today the very Baptistic place I live in has no cafeteria to beat the Baptists to, but there’s still a mission field out there, and it seems that we’ve beat the Baptists there too.

Without Clouds: A Good Friday Reflection

Recently I was speaking with a Nigerian pastor about current attitudes towards adversity in life.  I have seen many concerned about the effect of prosperity teaching on African Christians, and this pastor certainly practices an approach to ministry that is full of faith.  But he also accepts the reality that there will be adversity in life, that bad things will come along, even to God’s faithful.

That reminded me of a song that we used to sing in the Texas A&M Newman Association, the Dameans’ “Without Clouds:”

(Personally, I think our Texas-raised musicians did a better performance job than those, ahem, across the Sabine, but I digress…)

The refrain is as follows:

“Without clouds, the rain can’t wash the land
Without rain, the grass won’t hide the sand
Without grass, the flower’s bloom won’t grow
Without pain, the joy in life won’t show”

When I first heard this, I was going through Aquinas’ Summa, and he makes the following observation about the effect of adversity on the just:

“Justice and mercy appear in the punishment of the just in this world, since by afflictions lesser faults are cleansed in them, and they are the more raised up from earthly affections to God. As to this Gregory says (Moral. xxvi, 9): “The evils that press on us in this world force us to go to God.” (Summa Theologiae, Ia, 21.4 ad 3)

The emphasis is a little different in each, but the root idea is the same: adversity has the potential for good to come out of it.  I came to know this as “Without Clouds Theology.”

Many secularists (including newly minted ones like Bart Campolo) have disliked this whole concept, but what’s disturbing to me is that, in the intervening time, many American Christians have come to dislike it too.  Oh, they won’t say it directly, but we have the plague of “Open Theology,” and torturous attempts to explain the problem such as The Shack.  The simple fact of the matter is that too many American Christians have adopted the idea that life should be free of adversity or pain.

This idea didn’t come out of the blue; it comes from the culture, a culture that leads the church more often than the other way around.  To a large extent that belief has destabilised our culture and our country.  We can’t even stand the idea of people disagreeing with us let alone inflicting real pain; both UC Berkeley and Middlebury College saw violence to keep up a “safe space” for their true believers.  (You’d think that someone would point out that a group of white people with Murray’s supposedly higher IQ would have more to show for it then they do, but I digress…)

Now, of course, we have those who consider the Passion of Our Lord as “child abuse,” since the Father willed that the Son go to the Cross for the salvation of all people.  It never occurs to people like this that, to be in the “happy” state where they are, those in the past have sacrificed and suffered in a secular sense.    And those who did suffer and sacrifice knew that such was necessary to carry out what needed to be done.

It is in this context that the suitability of Our Lord’s saving act on the Cross must be seen.  It’s a reminder that the adversity of his suffering and death lead to the victory on Easter morning.  In the past the general state of life reminded people of the necessity of the Passion; now the accomplishment of the Passion must not only be the road to salvation, but also a reminder that the road to victory often runs through the land of pain, suffering and adversity.

Seeing, therefore, that there is on every side of us such a throng of witnesses, let us also lay aside everything that hinders us, and the sin that clings about us, and run with patient endurance the race that lies before us, our eyes fixed upon Jesus, the Leader and perfect Example of our faith, who, for the joy that lay before him, endured the cross, heedless of its shame, and now ‘has taken his seat at the right hand’ of the throne of God.  (Heb 12:1-2 TCNT)

The Five Lessons of Creation

From Philo Judaeus, On the Creation of the World, LXI:

And in his before mentioned account of the creation of the world, Moses teaches us also many other things, and especially five most beautiful lessons which are superior to all others.

  1. In the first place, for the sake of convicting the atheists, he teaches us that the Deity has a real being and existence. Now, of the atheists, some have only doubted of the existence of God, stating it to be an uncertain thing ; but others, who are more audacious, have taken courage, and asserted positively that there is no such thing; but this is affirmed only by men who have darkened the truth with fabulous inventions.

  2. In the second place he teaches us that God is one; having reference here to the assertors of the polytheistic doctrine men who do not blush to transfer that worst of evil constitutions, ochlocracy, from earth to heaven.

  3. Thirdly, he teaches, as has been already related, that the world was created; by this lesson refuting those who think that it is uncreated and eternal, and who thus attribute no glory to God.

  4. In the fourth place we learn that the world also which was thus created is one, since also the Creator is one, and he,making his creation to resemble himself in its singleness, employed all existing essence in the creation of the universe. For it would not have been complete if it had not been made and composed of all parts which were likewise whole and complete. For there are some persons who believe that there are many worlds, and some who even fancy that they are boundless in extent, being themselves inexperienced and ignorant of the truth of those things of which it is desirable to have a correct knowledge.

  5. The fifth lesson that Moses teaches us is, that God exerts his providence for the benefit of the world. For it follows of necessity that the Creator must always care for that which he has created, just as parents do also care for their children. And he who has learnt this not more by hearing it than by his own understanding, and has impressed on his own soul these marvellous facts which are the subject of so much contention namely, that God has a being and existence, and that he who so exists is really one, and that he has created the world, and that he has created it one as has been stated, having made it like to himself in singleness; and that he exercises a continual care for that which he has created will live a happy and blessed life, stamped with the doctrines of piety and holiness.

I would suggest that you (especially if you’re NEC) read this in light of this piece.